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Tarrn doon nonin

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research Ethics Project Award 

The Lowitja Institute is committed to undertaking research in ways that are culturally safe and ethically acceptable for everyone who is involved – research participants, communities /organisations and other interested community members, as well as the research team. Ethical research in this sector involves Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities influencing what, why, how and when research is done, as well as how it is used.

Tarrn doon nonin is the Woiwurrung language term for 'trust'

The Lowitja Institute is proud to offer the Tarrn doon nonin Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research Ethics Project Award, inaugurated in 2015. The award recognises and upholds respectful ethical practice in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research.

The award includes

  • $10,000 project grant to be administered by the Lowitja Institute. The grant is available for furthering the successful project through activities such as research translation, conference attendance, training and/or community capacity building and for resourcing further emerging research as a result of the project.
  • Travel and accommodation and a 3-day registration for two representatives of the successful project (one from the research team and one from the community organisation), to the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference.

The project representative will be notified two weeks prior to the announcement and presentation of the award.  This will be held at the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2019 on 18-20 June 2019 in Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia. For more information about the conference visit conference2019.lowitja.org.au.

Eligibility criteria

The eligibility criteria for this Award is as follows:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research projects that have been conducted by:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and/or collaborations
  • non-Indigenous organisations and/or collaborations

AND 

  • have finalised the active research and findings phase, and are close to completion; or have completed within the last two years

Previous winners include Mr John Singer, Dr Rosie King and Ms Janet Stajic for their work at the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia.

To apply complete the application form and referee form and submit HERE

Instructions for applying are included in the application form.

Created: 22 December 2014 - Updated: 10 December 2018