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A critical analysis of disability in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

PhD thesis by Scott Avery – University of New South Wales

Thesis

Statistics suggest that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people experience disability at a rate approximately twice that of other Australians. Despite the high prevalence of disability among Indigenous peoples, there is currently an inadequate understanding of their rights to inclusion in policy and practice. This research looks to ascertain Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives through the narratives of those with lived experience with disability.

Background

Scott Avery is the Policy and Research Director at the First Peoples Disability Network (Australia), a non-government organisation constituted by and for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability. He has an extensive career in public policy in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs, health, disability, justice and education. He is a passionate and active advocate for social justice working within the non-government sector. Scott is undertaking a Doctorate of Applied Public Health at the University of New South Wales investigating Indigenous constructions of disability. He is also the lead Investigator on a research program to develop a community-directed research agenda for Indigenous people with disability, which has been awarded funding support through the National Disability Research and Development Scheme. He is also the recipient of a research support scholarship from the Lowitja Institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Research and is a member of the Institute's Program Committee on Health Workforce.

Culture is Inclusion: A narrative of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with disability is available for purchase on the FPDN website.

Created: 30 June 2015 - Updated: 22 August 2018