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Data resource on key influences on health in the Northern Territory

A longitudinal data resource on key influences on health in the Northern Territory: Opportunities and obstacles

The role of social factors in contributing to the poor health status of Aboriginal people living in the Northern Territory is widely accepted, but not well understood. This project aimed to address this situation by providing a strong evidence base to support the development and implementation of policies that improve the social health of Aboriginal communities in the NT over the long term. As part of the project researchers developed a series of consistent indicators with standardised data definitions to measure the effectiveness of primary health care services. The project was also informed by a number of data-related projects undertaken through the Northern Territory-based Menzies School of Health Research (MSHR) and the CRC for Aboriginal Health, including specifically a project on the socio-economic and environmental determinants of health in Aboriginal communities in the NT (NT SEEDH – Stevens).

This project found that a Longitudinal Indicators Database (LID), containing NT community and regional level indicators for socio-economic and environmental determinants of health, as well as health indicators, is feasible. Combined with associated projects NT SEEDH and ABCD (Audit and Best-practice in Chronic Disease), this project also has the potential to assist and support data quality and validation procedures for data collecting agencies in the NT. Moving forward requires additional efforts, including a number of key steps:

Following a review of relevant research, stakeholder consultations and workshops were undertaken, which supported the review and refinement of 43 indicators that can be categorised into three broad domains:

Related resources:
Project leader

Ross Bailie

Administering institution:

Menzies School of Health Research

Completion date:

May 2006