Please be aware that this website may contain images, voices or names of deceased persons in the photographs, film, audio recordings or printed material.

Uptake of influenza vaccination in pregnancy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women

Uptake of influenza vaccination in pregnancy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women: A mixed methods study

Influenza is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in pregnant women. In Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, the burden of influenza is substantially higher, particularly during pandemics, and mechanisms to avoid excess morbidity and mortality need to be culturally specific. Influenza vaccination is recommended during pregnancy in several countries, including Australia, yet data on the uptake of vaccine and the determinants of vaccination in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations are scarce. This Menzies School of Health Research pilot study examined the uptake of influenza vaccine during pregnancy among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women from two urban/inner regional communities in South East Queensland. The mixed method study approach comprised three components: analysis of data, community-based cross-sectional surveys, and yarning circles.

Benefits and outcomes

Related resources:

Project leader

A/Prof Ross Andrews

Administering institution:

Menzies School of Health Research

Completion date:

2015