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Lowitja Institute welcomes Dr Michelle Kennedy to champion Aboriginal-led research

MEDIA RELEASE – 29 March 2022

The Lowitja Institute welcomes the appointment of Dr Michelle Kennedy to the role of executive manager – research and knowledge translation.

Dr Kennedy is a Wiradjuri woman raised on Worimi country in New South Wales with a grounding in Aboriginal health research at the College of Health Medicine and Wellbeing at the University of Newcastle.

“As the much-deserved winner of the Lowitja Institute Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student Award in 2019, we are excited that Michelle is joining the institute to further support Aboriginal-led research in the health and wellbeing of our peoples,” Adjunct Professor Janine Mohamed said. 

The Lowitja Institute Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student Award recognises excellence for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers undertaking either Masters or PhD study, and Dr Kennedy’s PhD research Culturally responsive approaches for the empowerment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in smoking cessation care privileged the voices and experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women to address policy and program reform. 

As Assistant Dean Indigenous Strategy and Leadership at the University of Newcastle, Dr Kennedy is also Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander vice president of the Public Health Association of Australia and an associate editor for the Public Health Research and Practice Journal.

“I am thrilled to be joining the Lowitja Institute to lead the research and knowledge translation agenda, which will privilege our peoples and communities as the knowledge holders and rightful people to drive transformational change for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health,” Dr Michelle Kennedy said.

“I am looking forward to resetting the research agenda through the creation of opportunities and supports for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander-led research.” 

Dr Mohamed said Michelle comes with a deep understanding of the history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander research – and the importance of embedding our ways of knowing, being and doing. 

“We look forward to working with Michelle to share the amazing work our Aboriginal community-controlled organisations and researchers are doing for our peoples.” 

– Adjunct Professor Janine Mohamed

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