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(De)Colonising ADHD: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Standpoints

PhD thesis by Nicky Flynn – Flinders University

Thesis

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents and caregivers face the challenge of understanding and dealing with Western standards of health and education when their children are diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). There is evidence that the development and incorporation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander standpoints and conceptual frameworks is paramount to ensuring successful health and education initiatives. Therefore, in this research major emphasis will be given to decolonising mainstream education and health policy in order to identify key distinctive cultural differences that contribute to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander wellbeing in relation to ADHD.

This research will develop new knowledge, tools and resources for use with ADHD diagnoses, to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander parents and caregivers can access high quality, culturally competent care from their standpoints. It will also support the development of educational initiatives that respond to those standpoints.

Background

Nicky is a Gamilaroi woman from Mungindi, New South Wales. Nicky has an eclectic ancestry – Aboriginal, Irish, English, Jamaican, and Indian.

Her qualifications include a Bachelor of Social Science (Human Services), Graduate Diploma Education, Master of Education, and she is currently a PhD candidate.

 

Created: 30 June 2015 - Updated: 15 August 2016