One21seventy workforce development

One of the major pieces of infrastructure that exists to help support the uptake of innovations into practice is the Brisbane-based One21seventy: National Centre for Quality Improvement in Indigenous Primary Health Care. This is a small service provision organisation established in 2009 as a spin-off from the CRCAH-funded ABCD (Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease) project. One21seventy provides a not-for-profit service that supports Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care services to use and benefit from continuous quality improvement (CQI) tools and techniques.

Since 2010, One21seventy has worked with over 200 health centres around Australia and trained over 900 primary health care staff in quality improvement processes.

The growth has increased the demand for workforce development and is driving training program innovation. Foundation training workshops now offer participants a hands-on experience in using the One21seventy database through the employment of iPads. A series of six eLearning Modules also provide an opportunity to learn about best-practice approaches in CQI in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care. The eLearning modules build on the current program of advanced CQI training workshops, offering self-paced online learning activities that can be accessed across Australia. The first three open access modules introduce population health approaches, CQI in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care and the One21seventy CQI model, tools and processes. The latter three member only modules take users through processes of interpreting audit report data, identifying improvement priorities, setting goals and planning strategies for implementation. Designed for senior clinicians, team leaders and managers who facilitate CQI, the modules are recommended for all healthcare workers involved in CQI. Funding support for these innovations has been provided by the Lowitja Institute.

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Created: 19 July 2012 - Updated: 18 May 2015