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Tarrn doon nonin

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research ethics award

Apply for the 2016 award

The 2016 Tarrn doon nonin Award will be presented at the Lowitja Institute International Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Conference 2016 on 8–10 November 2016 at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

2015 winners

Next Steps for Aboriginal Health Research: How research can improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal people in South Australia

Mr John Singer and Dr Rosie King of the Aboriginal Health Council of South Australia (AHCSA) and Ms Janet Stajic of the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (formerly of AHCSA)

Award presentation

Tarrn doon nonin is the Woiwurrung language term for 'trust'

The Lowitja Institute is proud to offer the Tarrn doon nonin Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research ethics award, inaugurated in 2015. The award recognises and upholds respectful ethical practice in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research.

Doing ethical health research in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander settings means doing research in ways that are culturally safe and ethically acceptable for all involved – research participants, communities/organisations and other interested community members, as well as the research team. It involves Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities influencing what, why, how and when research is done, as well as how it is used.

Eligibility criteria

Applications are open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research projects that have been conducted by:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander collaborations and/or organisations, and/or
  • non-Indigenous organisations and/or collaborations

and

  • have finalised the active research and findings phase, and are close to completion, or
  • have completed within the last two years.

Focus of research project

The specific focus of the project – clinical, epidemiological or population health research – must be the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population.

Selection criteria

Projects will be assessed against the following (criteria not listed in order of priority):

  1. The extent to which the research project was Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community initiated and community led
  2. The extent to which the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community was engaged with the research project from commencement to completion of the work
  3. The extent to which project stakeholders have worked in partnership and maintained relationships
  4. The level of capacity building and community strengthening, such as:
    • building on existing skills and abilities of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and community
    • offering opportunities for scholarships, traineeships and other professional development initiatives or Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
  5. The extent to which information about research translation for the project has been applied and particularly how project findings have been communicated back to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community
  6. Evidence of the project ethics process.

Note: A statement of support from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community involved in this research project is essential.

Prize

  • The The winning project will be awarded a $10,000 grant to be administered by the Lowitja Institute. The grant will be available for furthering the successful project through activities such as research translation, conference attendance, training and/or community capacity building or for resourcing further research that emerges from the project.
  • Two representatives of the successful project will be invited to attend the award ceremony held annually at the Lowitja Institute in Melbourne. Economy class air travel and one night’s accommodation will be provided.
Created: 22 December 2014 - Updated: 30 August 2016